Caregiver Reflections Archive

We Are Here

We Are Here

As written by Katie Emde from her blog @A Journey for Avery We will always fight for you. The days you are crying, the days you scream all day & when the meltdowns are never ending. We will...

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Strength Not Weakness

Strength Not Weakness

As written by Kim Mcisaac from her blog @Autism Adventures with Alyssa Mental health struggles are real and can be dark. You can lose your ability to cope and even to care. It can push you to the...

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When He Prays

When He Prays

As written by Lindsay Criswell from her blog @Branch and Stone Studio My son cannot usually answer open ended questions. He may not look you in the eye. My son might come by your side, but then he...

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Maybe One Day

Maybe One Day

As written by Margaret Hay from her blog @A&Me I am sometimes seen as rude. Uninterested. Detached. Maybe it is because when I bump into you when out, I often just say "hi" and then rush off...

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When Losing Hope isn’t an Option

When Losing Hope isn’t an Option

The following guest blog post was written by Michelle Kiger of My Redhead Warriors The last thing I ever want to do is lose hope. When our life gets really hard I try to think of our past. Look back...

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A Holy Shift

A Holy Shift

I descended the stairs, immediately irritated by what was awaiting me with each scream originating from my 15-year-old son. Great, I muttered as the uninvited stench rose to greet my nose. Luke, my...

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Holy Work

Holy Work

“This is holy work,” I begrudgingly reminded myself a day after returning home from a much needed vacation; a week of relaxation, sun, and reconnecting with my husband, and here I was now, again,...

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Manna for the Moment

Manna for the Moment

Luke has been back in school for about a week now. Experts claim that special needs caretakers often experience PTSD, and I particularly notice this tendency when I don’t have him on my radar for an...

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Luke’s Brain

Luke’s Brain

I often struggle to understand or explain Luke’s thought process to others. Luke, my 15 year old primarily non-verbal son with profound special needs. Friends, bystanders or even specialists will...

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